Self-Compassion as Self-Care for Grief Workshop Series

3 Wednesdays
September 5th to 19th, 2018
5:45 pm – 6:45 pm

Cost: $75 total for all 3 classes

Schedule Appointment

Tending to our own suffering with kindness is often placed on the back burner. Some of us can’t even imagine what it would be like to have the time, energy, and wherewithal to take care of ourselves – especially when we are faced with grief.

All too often we turn away from our own suffering and try to “push through” the pain. While distractions may provide temporary relief, avoidance is not a sustainable, long-term solution. When we ignore our body’s messages and emotional cues, we overwhelm our stress response system. This in turn can contribute to depression, anxiety, and stress-related illnesses. This is the bad news, but there is a remedy.

Though it may seem impossible now, the truth is that you can tend to your grieving body in a way that will calm your grieving mind, heart and spirit. And it only takes a few minutes a day to get started.

Once you learn how to apply the “oxygen mask” to yourself—and treat yourself as you would a beloved friend—you will learn that you can manage difficult emotions, reduce your suffering, and even inspire others to take control of their own health and well-being. All it takes is the right intention and a little bit of practice.

The self-compassion techniques you will learn are rooted in ancient spiritual practices, and have been proven to reduce anxiety, negative emotions, fear of suffering, and even avoidance in people with post-traumatic stress disorder. Self-compassion practices also improve emotional intelligence, coping skills, and a sense of connection with all sentient beings.

During this 3 week workshop series, Heather Stang, author of Mindfulness & Grief, will offer practical tips that will help you harness the power of self-compassion as self-care, so you can reduce your suffering and reengage with your precious life. You will also receive access to online guided meditations, so you can practice self-compassion for years to come.